Yakima Valley Audubon’s Vredenburgh Bluebird Trail Marks its 40th Year! | Andy Stepniewski | May/June 2022 | YVAS Program

Yakima Valley Audubon’s Vredenburgh Bluebird Trail Marks its 40th Year! - YVAS Monthly Program

In 1982, when nest boxes for bluebirds were first put out in the nearby Wenas Valley, little did this intrepid group of Yakima Auduboners know that 40 years later that the Vredenburgh Bluebird Trail, as it was later named, would still be going strong. To date, more than 17,000 bluebirds have fledged from this program. This is an amazing tribute to the numerous volunteers who have built and erected nest boxes They also faithfully monitored the birds’ nesting progress through the spring and summer season each year, and compiled the data of numbers fledged for both Western and Mountain Bluebirds. Come hear about both species of bluebirds, and also about the other birds and critters who use the same nesting cavities and boxes. In the nearby lower east slopes of the Cascades, bluebird populations had been severely depleted through widespread logging and habitat loss, eliminating many of the cavities in mature pines in which bluebirds historically nested. Nest box programs have helped augment both bluebird species. Come learn how to visit the bluebird trail, see the birds and their habitats. You also can help monitor and maintain the trail. Recently, Richard Repp has retired as Vredenburgh Bluebird Trail chairperson after more than 20 years of service. Karen Zook, has taken over the helm of the committee. Thanks are due to Richard Repp and Karen Zook who provided many recent photos and insight.

Posted by Yakima Valley Audubon Society on Friday, May 27, 2022

In 1982, when nest boxes for bluebirds were first put out in the nearby Wenas Valley, little did this intrepid group of Yakima Auduboners know that 40 years later that the Vredenburgh Bluebird Trail, as it was later named, would still be going strong. To date, more than 17,000 bluebirds have fledged from this program. This is an amazing tribute to the numerous volunteers who have built and erected nest boxes They also faithfully monitored the birds’ nesting progress through the spring and summer season each year, and compiled the data of numbers fledged for both Western and Mountain Bluebirds. 

Image - Mountain Bluebird - Karen Zook
Mountain Bluebird - Karen Zook

Come hear about both species of bluebirds, and also about the other birds and critters who use the same nesting cavities and boxes. In the nearby lower east slopes of the Cascades, bluebird populations had been severely depleted through widespread logging and habitat loss, eliminating many of the cavities in mature pines in which bluebirds historically nested. Nest box programs have helped augment both bluebird species. Come learn how to visit the bluebird trail, see the birds and their habitats. You also can help monitor and maintain the trail.

Recently, Richard Repp has retired as Vredenburgh Bluebird Trail chairperson after more than 20 years of service. Karen Zook, has taken over the helm of the committee. Thanks are due to Richard Repp and Karen Zook who provided many recent photos and insight.